25.6 C
Willemstad
• zondag 29 januari 2023

PBC | Dagje vrij voor Oranjes

Persbureau Curacao KRALENDIJK – De koninklijke familie kan vandaag even op adem komen. Prinses Amalia, koning Willem-Alexander en koningin Máxima hebben geen activiteiten op de planning staan. Vanmiddag...

PBC | Winstbelasting Curaçao zeven procent omlaag

Persbureau Curacao WILLEMSTAD – Curaçao verlaagt de winstbelasting voor ondernemers van 22 naar vijftien procent. De verlaging geldt voor de eerste 500.000 gulden. Dat meldt het ministerie van...

AD | Op Bonaire hoort Amalia overal haar eigen naam

Jeroen Schmale | Algemeen Dagblad De introductiereis van prinses Amalia met haar ouders op de Antillen begon zaterdag echt op Bonaire. Conclusies na een dag in het spoor...
- Advertentie -

NOS | Oranjes stappen dansvloer op bij bezoek aan Bonaire

Met een dag vol activiteiten, waarbij er zelfs een dansje werd gewaagd, is het bezoek van de koninklijke familie aan Caribisch Nederland officieel begonnen. Prinses Amalia, koning...

NTR | Leerorkest Aruba oefent met eigen ‘prinses’ Amalia

Melissa Stamper Voor de 9-jarige Amalia Hazel is de komst van haar koninklijke naamgenoot naar Aruba extra bijzonder. Samen met de andere kinderen in het Leerorkest van Aruba...

DH | Fire at District 721

SIMPSON BAY—Entertainment complex District 21 on Welfare Road caught fire early Sunday morning and largely burned down. The blaze started around 5:30am and quickly spread through...

BNR | Greenpeace: rechtszaak tegen Staat om Bonaire is noodzakelijk

Greenpeace verwacht dat de Nederlandse overheid voorlopig onvoldoende zal ingrijpen om Bonaire te beschermen tegen de gevolgen van klimaatverandering. Daarom zal uiteindelijk een rechtszaak tegen de Staat...
- Advertentie -

Reuters | Citgo, Valero try to return Venezuelan oil following sanctions

By Marianna Parraga

A Citgo, Valero (PDVSA) refinery in Aruba, several miles off the coast from Venezuela

(Reuters) – The top U.S. buyers of Venezuelan oil are in the unusual position of trying to return millions of barrels of crude they need but cannot accept because of U.S. sanctions on the South American nation and its state-run energy firm PDVSA.

PDVSA’s U.S. refining subsidiary Citgo Petroleum Corp and Valero Energy are proposing to return 2 million barrels of crude loaded before sanctions, while a third U.S. oil company, Chevron Corp, has sought so far unsuccessfully to legally pay for 4.3 million barrels, according to an internal PDVSA document seen by Reuters.

In effect, more than 6 million barrels of Venezuelan crude remain in limbo as a result of U.S. sanctions imposed on Jan. 28 by Washington in an effort to oust President Nicolas Maduro. The United States and dozens of other nations recognized opposition leader Juan Guaido as the nation’s legitimate leader.

To comply with U.S. sanctions, Valero, Citgo and others are not allowed to pay PDVSA. Guaido’s administration has yet to establish its own bank accounts to receive proceeds from oil sales to U.S. customers, leaving those shipments stranded.

Overall oil exports from the OPEC member state dropped by about 40 percent in the first full month of sanctions, as the U.S. sought to cut oil revenue to Maduro, who presides over a nation beset by a years-long economic crisis, with millions fleeing for a lack of food and medicine.

PDVSA, Citgo and Valero did not reply to requests for comment. Chevron does not comment on supply and trade matters, a spokesman said.

STRANDED TANKERS

The standoff has stranded some 6.4 million barrels of Venezuelan heavy crude onboard 11 tankers originally destined for the United States, as they have not been authorized to set sail. The vessels fell into limbo because PDVSA demanded prepayment for the cargos after sanctions were imposed, which U.S. firms cannot do.

Chevron, the second-largest U.S. oil firm by market value, wanted to take the oil shipments in lieu of loans and dividends stemming from joint ventures with PDVSA, a person close to the matter said. The cargoes were loaded at Venezuelan ports ahead of sanctions, but they remain undelivered, according to the document, and it is unclear if PDVSA would accept that offer.

Valero proposed to pay PDVSA for 1.05 million barrels of Venezuelan oil, but that request was rejected by the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), which oversees sanctions, the documents said.

The Houston-based Citgo cut ties with its parent company in compliance with U.S. measures that halted its purchases of PDVSA’s oil, the documents said.

A U.S. Treasury spokesperson declined to comment on the requests to pay PDVSA for the cargoes.

As of March 8, the 11 loaded vessels remained anchored off ports in Venezuela. Two other Chevron-chartered cargoes were stuck off the U.S. Gulf Coast and a third was returned to Venezuela’s Amuay terminal, according to Refinitiv Eikon vessel-tracking data.

PDVSA does not expect Citgo or Valero to accept the cargos and intends to “commercially reallocate the volumes onboard so tankers can be freed,” a Feb. 21 trade and supply document showed. The same document expressed worry over demurrage fees – the daily cost for storing the oil on tankers – which have been accumulating for over a month.

PDVSA SCRAMBLES TO AVOID EXPORT SHORTFALL

Separately, a days-long blackout across the country has halted exports from Jose port, the nation’s primary crude export terminal. PDVSA on Monday was trying to restart operations.

The Venezuelan company has been forced to redesign its production and export logistics in recent weeks to avoid halting operations, including formulating new crude blends, swapping a large portion of its oil for imported fuel, selling through intermediaries and finding new customers.

But the efforts have not been enough to avoid an export decline. The OPEC-member country’s oil shipments fell to some 920,000 barrels per day (bpd) in February according to Refinitiv Eikon data.

PDVSA exports could fall further due to a lack of imported naphtha, a light distillate, needed to dilute its extra heavy oil as the company has been able to secure only two 500,000-barrel cargoes versus 2-3 million barrels per month needed, according to the document.

Bron: Reuters

Artikel delen

Geef een reactie

Vul alstublieft uw commentaar in!
Vul hier uw naam in

Lees ook

Zoeken

- Advertentie -

Nieuwe reacties

- Advertentie -